Course Descriptions

ECE Curriculum

Course Descriptions

Electrical and Computer Engineering Core Curriculum

The ECE Curriculum consists of basic math and science classes, core ECE classes, Engineering Clinic sequence classes and ECE electives. The descriptions of all core ECE courses as well as Engineering Clinic courses are described below. For course descriptions of classes offered by other departments, such as Mathematics, Computer Science, and Physics, please see the Rowan Undergraduate Catalog.

CORE ECE CLASSES

ECE 09241: Introduction to Digital Systems (3 s.h.)

Digital Systems dominate the globe, from a simple stopwatch to a cell phone to the international space station, each of these is dependent on Digital Systems. Digital systems, at the most elementary level, are composed of 0's and 1's and rudimentary logic functions. This core course takes a hands-on approach, starting with how to physically build basic logic functions (AND, OR, NOT) from transistors all the way to how to combine these functions to make complex digital systems. During this class, students will learn how numbers and information are stored and manipulated in a digital system, and how these basic principals can be expanded to create a computer processor. The focus of the course will be on alternative number systems (Binary, Octal, Hexadecimal), Boolean algebra, minimization, combinational circuit design, and sequential circuit design. Both synchronous and asynchronous network design and state machines will be covered. Students will get hands-on experience using modern development tools to design, test, and implement digital systems. Taken during the Fall semester of the Freshman year, this is the first class in the ECE major curriculum and provides an opportunity to jump right into the modern world of electrical and computer engineering on day 1. 

ECE 09203: Principles of Electric Circuit Analysis (4 s.h.)

The fundamental principles of circuit and network theory constitute the very foundation on which the field of electrical engineering stands. From a simple household item such as a toaster or flashlight to the most advanced devices, large scale electric power distribution and transmission systems, including such emerging topics as smart grid, photovoltaic energy generation to electric vehicle technology, all operate based on the basic concepts of circuit and network theory. This core course, which constitutes the primary prerequisite of most other ECE courses, is designed to provide the students not only with a comprehensive foundation of circuit and network theory, but also the basic skills of circuit analysis, design, and testing. Starting with Ohm's Law, this course first discusses resistive and DC circuits and introduces Kirchhoff's Laws, Thevenin and Norton equivalents of networks, mesh and nodal analysis, followed by independent and dependent sources, and operational amplifiers. The second half of the course focuses on AC circuits and memristors. Laplace transforms will be introduced for transient and steady state response of networks, followed by various applications of AC circuits, such as filters. Computer-aided analysis and simulation tools are also presented as contemporary methods of network analysis and design.

ECE 09243: Computer Architecture (3 s.h.)

As computer and embedded systems proliferate into every area of life it is critical to understand the underlying technology empowering the digital age. In this course, students will build a fully functional 16-bit microcontroller from the gate level up. All subjects required to complete this task will be covered: instruction set architectures, data path components and design, control unit design, memory hierarchies, IO and peripheral design, and assembly language; additionally advanced modern computer architectures such as Intel’s Core i7. The course will emphasize learning in the context of project development and specifically focus on the Scrum agile methodology applied to remote teams.

ECE 09303: Engineering Electromagnetics (3 s.h.)

Engineering electromagnetics covers applications of electrostatics, magnetostatics, quasistatics, and electromagnetic wave propagation in contemporary electrical engineering practice. The course also covers numerical modeling/analysis of electromagnetic systems using appropriate software and laboratory-based measurements.

ECE 09311: Electronics I (3 s.h.)

As a follow-up course to Principles of Electric Circuit Analysis, Electronics I is the first course in electronics and delves into the properties of nonlinear devices and the techniques to design and analyze circuits using these devices. All modern-day electronic devices consist largely of these nonlinear devices including diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The electronics may consist of discrete and/or integrated devices. This course begins with the design and analysis of electronic circuits using “real” (non-ideal) op amps. It then provides a comprehensive discussion of the fundamentals of circuits involving diodes, bipolar-junction transistors and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The emphasis of this class is on designing practical circuits and includes multistage amplifiers, differential amplifiers, circuits combining op amps with discrete elements, audio amplifiers, integrated circuits, and analog and digital techniques. Analysis and design are accomplished first through analytical design, followed by computer simulation (SPICE) and finally real-world implementation through hands-on laboratory experiments.

ECE 09321: Systems And Control I (3 s.h.)

The first course in control systems introduces the fundamental concepts of linearity, time-invariance, stability and the transfer function. Mathematical and circuit equivalence of different systems (electrical, mechanical, fluidic, and thermal) are established. A thorough treatment of stability through the Routh-Hurwitz, root locus and Nyquist criterion is given. Frequency response analysis by means of the Bode plot is also covered. Software simulation primarily with MATLAB and laboratory experiments will complement and supplement the theory.

ECE 09341: Signals And Systems (2 s.h.)

Continuous and discrete systems are used in every branch of engineering. Communication systems (for the transmission of voice, video and data), robotic systems, energy systems, biometric systems (identification of a person based on physiological traits), systems that aid the handicapped and system-on-chip circuits are just a few examples that use the fundamental principles taught in this course. This course provides students with a foundation in linear dynamical systems and provides the appropriate background to engage in more advanced subjects like controls, signal processing, and communications. This course will discuss the fundamental tools associated with the analysis of continuous (Laplace transform, Fourier transform and Fourier series) and discrete (z-transform) signals and systems. The concepts of impulse response, frequency response, convolution are taught with the appropriate background in complex numbers and variables. Simple analog and digital filters and their practical uses form a major component of the laboratory component.

ECE 09342: Introduction to Embedded Systems (3 s.h.)

With more embedded systems being sold each year, the demand for engineers who understand these systems is ever increasing. This course introduces students to microprocessors and microcontrollers from instruction sets and architecture to peripherals and software. Several processor architectures and instruction sets are briefly covered as well as assembly language; however, the majority of the course focuses on embedded software. At the end of this course, students will be able to develop embedded systems to solve real design problems. The focus of this course will be on using embedded peripherals (analog to digital converters, communications, timers, interrupts, PWM, etc.). Students will work hands-on with their own embedded systems from the beginning of the course and will learn how to design basic embedded systems using modern integrated development environments. There will be a strong emphasis on project-based learning and each student will be required to make a significant contribution to a final project.

ECE 09351: Digital Signal Processing (3 s.h.)

This class is concerned with processing of digital and/or discrete time signals using linear time invariant systems, hence digital signal processing - DSP. It is DSP that makes communication systems, medical diagnosis and monitoring systems, engine diagnostics, seismic/tectonic/oceanographic analysis systems, all of audio-visual entertainment systems and many other countless systems possible. This course has been designed to deepen the real-world perspective at the forefront in each topic discussed, without sacrificing any of the elegant mathematics that underlies all DSP techniques. The primary goals of this course are to (1) introduce time and frequency domain concepts and the associated mathematical tools that are fundamental to all DSP techniques; and (2) provide a thorough understanding and working knowledge of design, implementation, analysis and comparison of digital filters for processing of discrete-time signals. The class will discuss the following topics: representation of signals and systems in time and frequency domains, the z-transform, filter structures, filter design and implementation, random signal analysis and spectral estimation, finite wordlength effects and wavelet transforms for time-frequency analysis.

ECE 09363: Modules In Electrical And Computer Engineering 1 s.h.

The field of electrical and computer engineering is very diverse and is growing exponentially. This course is designed to serve as a feedback and feed-forward mechanism not only to reinforce certain topics previously discussed in the curriculum but also to introduce new and/or emerging topics that are not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. The course is taught as a series of modules covering topics that are not part of any particular course, (e.g., power systems, smart power grid), topics to be reinforced, (engineering probability and statistics, random signals, transform techniques), and/or emerging topics that are not yet fully integrated into the curriculum. Therefore, different offerings of this course may have different topical content, chosen based on the feedback of the faculty and students during curriculum assessment, as well as important emerging topics that push the boundaries of electrical and computer engineering.

ECE 09414: Very Large Scale Integration Systems (3 s.h.)

This course provides an introduction to the design and implementation of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits for complex digital systems with a focus on CMOS technology. Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) and Full-custom techniques will be explored and used to design basic cells and regular structures such as data-path and memory arrays. The emphasis is on modern design issues in power, interconnected and clocking. Topics discussed in this class include VLSI design flow; transistor-level CMOS physical design; gate function and timing characteristics; high-level digital functional blocks; and CMOS digital chip design. Students will design and verify circuits using commercial Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools.

ECE 09433: Electrical Communications Systems (3 s.h.)

This is a senior level undergraduate course that covers the fundamentals of analog and digital communication systems, along with optimal receivers, concept of a matched filter, error rate and intersymbol interference. Appropriate mathematical background in Fourier transforms, probability and random variables are taught. The student is exposed to software and hardware designs.

ECE 09460: Electrical Engineering Clinic Consultant I (1 s.h.)

This course provides the student with disciplinary background and preparation for consulting work in support of multidisciplinary clinic projects. Work and topics will be directed by the clinic discipline manager.

ECE 09462: Electrical Engineering Clinic Consultant II (1 s.h.)

This course provides the student advanced disciplinary background and preparation for consulting work in support of multidisciplinary clinic projects. Work and topics will be directed by the clinic discipline manager.

ECE 09498: Seminar: Engineering Frontiers (1 s.h.)

The Seminar in Engineering Frontiers will provide students with a glimpse into contemporaneous cutting edge technology and research in electrical and computer engineering. Course content and topics will change with each offering to maintain currency with the frontiers of engineering technology

 

ENGINEERING CLINICS

 

ENGR 01101: Freshman Engineering Clinic I (2 s.h.)

This course presents an introduction to the practice of engineering through application problems drawn from engineering disciplines chosen to amplify work drawn from supporting courses. It includes topics such as: technical communication formats; analytical tools; computer-based tools: introduction to design; engineering ethics; teamwork.

ENGR 01102: Freshman Engineering Clinic II (2 s.h.)

This course, a continuation of Freshman Engineering Clinic I, provides expanded treatment of the practice of engineering through applications drawn from engineering disciplines. Project work includes a variety of technical communication topics, analytic and computer-based tools, including the design process, engineering ethics, safety, and team work.

ENGR 01201: Sophomore Engineering Clinic I (4 s.h.)

This course, a continuation of the Engineering Clinic series, provides expanded treatment of the practice of engineering through applications drawn from various engineering disciplines and industry. Project work includes a variety of technical communication topics, analytic and computer-based tools, including the design process, engineering ethics, safety and teamwork. The composition component presents critical thinking, reading, writing, research and argumentation.

ENGR 01202: Sophomore Engineering Clinic II (4 s.h.)

This course is a continuation of the Engineering Clinic sequence that provides design and design support experiences. The clinic also integrates information from supporting courses. The goal of the public speaking component is to enable students to participate effectively in oral communication, especially as related to technical presentations.

ENGR 01301: Junior Engineering Clinic I (2 s.h.)

This is one course in a sequence of courses that will provide a meaningful research and design experience for a team of undergraduate students under the direction of an engineering faculty advisor. The research topic will be chosen by mutual agreement of the undergraduate students and their advisor. The sequence will include a thorough literature search and review, the development of a clear and concise problem statement, consultations with other faculty and professional experts, and the derivation of publishable results. The research will culminate in a final written report and oral presentation.

ENGR 01302: Junior Engineering Clinic II (2 s.h.) 

This is one course in a sequence of courses that will provide a meaningful research and design experience for a team of undergraduate students under the direction of an engineering faculty advisor. The research topic will be chosen by mutual agreement of the undergraduate students and their advisor. The sequence will include a thorough literature search and review, the development of a clear and concise problem statement, consultations with other faculty and professional experts, and the derivation of publishable results. The research will culminate in a final written report and oral presentation.

ENGR 01401: Senior Engineering Clinic I (2 s.h.) 

This course provides a culminating experience to the Engineering Clinic sequence. The goal of this sequence of courses is to give teams of undergraduate engineering students a meaningful, leading-edge, team-based, multidisciplinary project experience. The sequence will include a thorough literature search and review, the development of a clear and concise problem statement, consultations with other faculty and professional experts, and delivery of a final written report and oral presentation.

ENGR 01402: Senior Engineering Clinic II - Writing Intensive (2 s.h.) 

This course provides a culminating experience to the Engineering Clinic sequence. The goal of this sequence of courses is to give teams of undergraduate engineering students a meaningful, leading-edge, team-based, multidisciplinary engineering project experience. The sequence will include a thorough literature search and review, the development of a clear and concise problem statement, consultations with other faculty and professional experts, and delivery of a final written report and oral presentation.